Study on the genetics of osteoarthritis

October 26, 2015

"Many trials for osteoarthritis therapies have failed due to the inability to identify the group at highest risk for progression over short periods of time," said Virginia Byers Kraus, MD, PhD, collaborator at Duke University. "The identification of these variations in the IL-1 receptor antagonist gene may form one strategy of identifying such individuals that could help release this major roadblock to developing more effective drugs for osteoarthritis."

Interleukin Genetics identified and holds patents on genetic patterns that lead to over-production of interleukin-1, one of the key chemicals involved in cartilage and bone destruction, and on specific genetic patterns that are predictive of OA progression.

"We're excited at the potential for clinical use of our genetic biomarkers to aid drug companies in the development of a treatment to halt the progression of this crippling disease," said Ken Kornman, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, Interleukin Genetics, Inc. "This publication is the positive culmination of Interleukin Genetics' research on genetic patterns related to interleukin-1 and dedication by our university partners to better understand and treat this disease."

SOURCE Interleukin Genetics, Inc.